Tag Archives: pregnancy in cats

Caring for a Pregnant Cat

Is your kitty pregnant? Whether Fluffy got out one night and came home with something to show for it, is a pregnant foster or stray you’ve been caring for, or was bred intentionally, your feline pal will need some extra TLC in the coming weeks. A Saskatoon, Saskatchewan vet discusses caring for pregnant cats below.

Food

Proper nutrition is important for all kitties, but it’s absolutely crucial for pregnant ones. Your furry buddy will need extra calories, as she’s eating for herself and her litter of furballs. Kitten food is often a good choice, as it has additional nutrients. Ask your vet for specific advice.

Handling

It is safe to pet Fluffy. However, you will want to avoid touching her belly, as it will be quite sensitive. If you have to pick your pet up, take care not to hold her by the stomach.

Birthing Box

Cats are usually in gestation for 58 – 67 days. As your kitty gets closer to delivery, you’ll need to give her a safe place to give birth. A big box is fine. You can also use a storage tote with one side cut out. Just make sure there are no sharp edges. Add clean, soft blankets or towels. You’ll want to choose ones you don’t really care about, of course. Put the box in a spot that offers your furball some peace and quiet, and show it to her. Don’t be surprise if Fluffy ignores it. If she chooses to give birth somewhere else, just move the kittens into the box after they’re born. Mama will follow!

Delivery

Most of the time, kitties can give birth on their own. However, you should monitor Fluffy, and watch for signs that something is wrong. If your pet takes more than two hours between kittens, if a kitten seems to be ‘stuck’ for more than a minute or two, or if your cat has contractions for more than 15 minutes without giving birth, contact your vet. Foul-smelling discharge is also a sign of trouble. We also recommend having your vet examine your feline buddy after the birth. Once the kittens have been born, the warning signs will change. Vomiting, diarrhea, and/or tremors are red flags at this stage. Call your vet immediately if you see any of these symptoms.

Please contact us, your Saskatoon, Saskatchewan vet clinic, anytime. We’re here to help!